Tagged: religion

Can We Know God’s Will for our Lives? Part 2

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In my last post, I suggested that a Christian should be able to answer the questions, what is God saying to me and how do I know that he’s saying it?

Unfortunately, some Christians feel they need to discern God’s will about what they eat for dinner. What we eat for dinner is not something that God is really concerned with, provided we eat with gratitude. An important reality, often overlooked in our anxious searches for God’s will, is that many life decisions are left for us to make freely. Some Christians walk with an enormous weight of uncertainty, worrying about every jot and tittle of their lives, when God has allowed a certain degree of freedom.

Through Scripture, we know enough about God to make most decisions. Some questions have been answered with a “no” and others with a “yes,” while many other questions are left to up to us. Imagine God gave you a watch. Would you honour him more by asking him for the time or by looking at the watch? I know that I ought to practice kindness and patience towards my wife, and I know that I ought not hate or judge my brother. However, what I eat for dinner is my choice.

Still, some decisions require more than logical reasoning and biblical knowledge. Some decisions we face beckon us to slow down and listen carefully to God’s direction. Maybe it’s prioritizing tasks for the week in order to make decisions well, or considering a career or relational opportunity that might change the direction of one’s life completely. There are certain matters we know the answer to, other matters in which we are free to choose for ourselves, and still other matters that require thoughtful and prayerful discernment.

Let me illustrate:

Pretend a coach of a soccer team has drafted you into his team. When it’s game time, it would be silly to ask about the rules of another sport, or whether or not you should try to work as a team with the other players. The first question is irrelevant and the second is obvious.

Likewise, to fret about God’s will for my dinner or whether or not I should be “kind” to my neighbour misses the point of discernment. In the first instance, we’re asking a question that has nothing to do with the game or even the sport, and in the second instance we’re ignoring the rules of the game we’ve already been given. There are also moments in the game when passing the ball to player A or player B will be your choice, and to ask the coach for his instruction in that moment would be detrimental to the game.

I know the rules, I know the point of the game, I know that there will be moments where I must depend on my reflexes and choose accordingly. In this way, we can understand “God’s will for my life” as referring to my position on the field and how I can best use my strengths to win the game according to the strategy.

In order for me to play well I will ultimately need to know myself: how am I built to play this game well? This is the task of discernment.

Seeking God’s will for my life does not dismiss everything he’s already revealed in Scripture, but seeks to understand my fit in it. What are my “gifts” in the context of the team and the strategy already given?

The particular will of God we seek is in the context of our participation in the life of the church.

One of the early challenges the church had to wrestle through was individual gifting, or vocation. Every individual equally contributed to the life of the whole, just like every part of a body contributes to the life of the body. And that body, being the church, exists for the common good of society. The question is: what is Jesus saying to me personally (now comes in the individual, the parts that make up the whole), in the context of our calling to be the church in our world.

We must learn to listen to the voice of Jesus for ourselves, but not apart from our team. So how will we do it?

Here are five voices we must be listening to in the dance of discernment:

1) We listen to Scripture, which speaks not only to our heads, but to our hearts as we contemplate its stories and teachings. Scripture has an authoritative power, not because it has special secrets about how old the earth is, but because it has a special way of igniting faith, hope, and love in us. In an overarching sense, Scripture tells us of the gospel news of God’s rescue mission to bring the world to its intended harmony. It tells us the rules of the game and the strategy for winning. But to know how we fit in the game we need to learn to read the Bible personally: how is a passage, a verse, a story speaking to you, in this moment?  When we take the time to slow down, listen, and contemplate God’s word, it has a special power to speak to us in a personal way, because the Bible always brings us to the person of Jesus who is the Word of God in the flesh. Sometimes this means sticking with one word, one verse, one parable or psalm or story that sticks out to you, and letting it resonate with you until your heart catches guides your head. Perhaps you’ll receive a picture, an invitation, a sense of gratitude, or a memory. This isn’t an easy discipline, but a very rewarding one.

2) We listen to people in our lives who can help us see our blind spots. Who are we reading the Bible with? Who are we worshiping with on Sundays? Who knows you enough and loves you enough to be honest with you about who you really are? But beware of people telling you what God is telling you: they may be able to guide, to advise, and even to offer an opinion, but only you can know the inner witness of the Spirit.

3) We listen to the friendships we find in the church, the local and the historical, the present and the past. Scripture has a personal and concrete word for us, yet keeping ancient friends from our Christian heritage will help us keep from making Scripture fit our own designs. Let the creeds of the church be the boundary markers of the soccer field, telling you if you’re in, or if you’re out. The creeds can also help you make sense of where you are on the pitch, providing you with an orientation that helps you know if you should pass or shoot. Our forefathers were at a different level in their prayer lives. Find an old prayer book to help you discover  new ways to foster intimacy with God (Augustine’s Confessions is one of my favourites).

4) We listen to our circumstances: how has God provided the context you are now in? Pay attention to the circumstances of your life. How are you to be faithful in your current circumstances? What do you like or dislike about your circumstances that you would like to change or not change? These questions force us to be honest about what is possible and what isn’t. But don’t eliminate the apparently impossible option, because God may indeed be calling you to something that in this moment, feels impossible. This listening is merely a matter of seeing clearly how God has been at work in your circumstances. Oppositions and obstacles need to be considered, but don’t be quick to take them as signs that this isn’t what God wants: God may very well be asking you to walk through a closed door.

5) We listen to our emotions, which help us identify what we love and what we dislike.   We tend to be suspicious of emotions, for fear of emotionalism, and end up putting too much weight on our rational abilities. However, Descartes was wrong when he proposed that humans are merely thinking beings. We are thinking, loving, and acting beings, far more complex that what Descartes suggested. Emotions are at the heart (no pun intended) of what it means to be human and in order to properly discern the voice of Christ, we need to develop the capacity to articulate what is happening to us emotionally.

All of these activities happen in the context of a life devoted to prayer. Prayer is the glue that helps us make sense of each sphere of our lives. Prayer is our response to God’s initiation; in prayer, we are always responding to God’s YES to us in Christ. Prayer is constant dialogue with the coach, cheering and guiding us on as we play the game.

Seeking the will of God is not as simple as a question and answer session. Discernment is a process, it is a game, or a dance or like being part of an orchestra. We attentively listen and watch the conductor move his baton towards a harmonious composition. As we learn to play in sync with the voice of the coach, God’s team defeats opponents not by beating them but by winning them over to a new way of playing.

Feel free to share your thoughts or experiences on discernment and seeking God’s will below.

Attending to Jesus

I’m observing Lent for the first time.

Again I am reminded of Paul’s prayer, “I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection and the fellowship of sharing in his sufferings, becoming like him in his death” (Phil. 3:10).

From a devotional I am using, Lent is described as

“a season of preparation and repentance during which we anticipate the death (Good Friday) and resurrection (Easter Sunday) of Jesus. It is this very preparation and repentance – aimed at grasping the intense significance of the crucifixion – that gives us a deep and powerful longing for the resurrection, the joy of Easter.”

The purpose of Lent then, is to meet with Jesus. My prayer is that he would meet with me, so I’ll be attending to Him. Not simply when I have devotionals or time set apart for prayer, but my hope is that I will be attending to him wholly, fully, as I study and research for school, as I spend time with friends, as I work, that I would be attending to Him, waiting on Him to meet with me.

“Search me, O God, and know my heart; try me and know my thoughts. See if there is any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting” (Ps. 139:23-24). 

BOOK REVIEW: The Best Kept Secret of Christian Mission – John Dickson

(citations are from the kindle edition)

In John Dickson’s The Best Kept Secret of Christian Mission, Dickson brings an unexpected approach to rediscovering the biblical grounds for orthodox Christian missions. The reader will find a professionally written composition that includes exegetical data understood in its historical, biblical, and linguistic context, in addition to personal stories of gospel encounters, bringing to life the propositions grounded in scriptural analysis. It is informal and theoretical, yet made remarkably practical. Dickson’s stories remind the reader that doctrines alone cannot bring to life the truth of the gospel, but that true missions must involve an encounter with the reality of Jesus’ Lordship. This is Dickson’s overall argument; that to promote the gospel in a biblical fashion involves every aspect of ones life being rooted in the embracing of ‘the Gospel as revealed in the gospels’ — the ‘here and coming’ kingdom of Jesus being Lord. Thus, for Dickson, the Gospel is more than a set of doctrines but is rather founded on the narrative of the life, death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus, and the key to all of these is that they point to Jesus being Lord and king. This is what is primarily central to the Gospel. In light of this gospel, its promotion is not founded on soteriologically driven themes that prioritize personal salvation (though it may include them), but on the story of Jesus, his kingdom, and its consequences.  Dickson’s ability to stay balanced is an uncommon, yet pleasant approach. He claims that “the gospel message is not a set of theological ideas that can be detached from the events that gave these ideas definitive expression.  Nor is the gospel a simple narrative devoid of theological content” (1872).  Ultimately, an encounter with this gospel inevitably leaves an impact on every aspect of life.  Confronting the matter regarding evangelism training programs, Dickson rightly claims that programs “that focus on the doctrines of sin, atonement and grace without also stressing the need to be gentle, respectful and gracious are incomplete” (2788). Therefore, rightly understanding and receiving the gospel of Jesus being Lord must inescapably result in a graceful lifestyle that simultaneously beautifies and promotes the gospel message.

The climactic chapter that has brought most personal gain for myself would be that of the Gospel. Dickson puts into perspective what the gospel really is, the “Gospel as portrayed by the gospels.” He shares a most enlightening conclusion that to tell the gospel involves “recounting the deeds of the Messiah Jesus” (1685). I have gained a personal sense of urgency coming from the realization that the majority of evangelical circles today have deduced the gospel to four spiritual laws centered on personal salvation. In engaging with the ‘cognitive dissonance theory’ that Dickson makes reference to, I ask: is it not possible that we have modified the gospel to fit our consumerist society? Have we, due to our consumerist mindset, deduced the gospel to matters of personal benefit, and at what expense? When the promotion of God’s glory is central to the gospel then we are disarmed in being consumer driven. Subsequently, the privatization of the gospel experience has perhaps caused us to fail to realize that the gospel has more to do with breaking cultural barriers than we might think. In Dickson’s chapter “Following the ‘Friend of Sinners,’” he briefly points out that Paul criticized Peter for “not acting in line with the truth of the gospel” when he separated himself from the Gentiles (Galatians 2:14).  Thus, when we act in line with the truth of the gospel, we are not creating cultural barriers, but like Paul and Jesus, we live “oriented toward the salvation of outsiders,” (715) since “eating with sinners was for Paul exactly what it had been for Jesus: an embodiment of the salvation message itself” (731). One can perhaps make the argument that we have sidelined issues of racial segregation at the aggrandizement of personal salvation. Thus, the gospel has much to do with community; it is not a private salvation but a communal and public one. Citing Rodney Stark as referenced in Dickson’s chapter entitled “Being the Light of the World,” Stark claims that  “a major way in which Christianity served as a revitalization movement within the empire was in offering a coherent culture that was entirely stripped of ethnicity.” It is this new ‘culture’ that resulted from a kingdom-centered gospel, and this is the key to a continuing revitalization: when the message of Christ’s here and coming kingdom is central to the gospel it will empower the Church to truly be the Light of the World (1366).

 

What Rationalism Has To Do With Easter

Presuppositions will kill the life of God in us.

             Rationalism is the idea of intelligence at work, efficiency and quality. Getting the most for the least, high production, less work, more money, more of what is calculable. A dependance in self, in humanity and ultimately in what is within and not without. Humans are not individuals but numbers in a system that must produce and must produce efficiently. We live in societies not communities, we value technology and whatever makes life productive and efficient at the expense of community and relationship. The young and strong are prized, and the old and weak are a nuisance. It seems impossible not to think rationally, in fact to not think rationally is social suicide, it places one within the bounds of fanaticism and emotionalism, and eventually in a place of seclusion. It seems ironic that the only way one can exeperience community is through rationalism, yet its by this rationalism that leads us away from true community. We have rationalized our need for community in pseudo-communities that take place on a private level, lacking relational intimacy and truth. They take the form of what we call “social networks” – accomplishing nothing more than proving the fact of our inward longing for relationship. I recently read a tweet (ironically) saying that “people go on facebook so much because they feel liek their doing something important” – I would say people go on facebook so often because they feel like they’re part of something important. Needless to say, no man can live on facebook alone, so we move on to more “networks” – rationally thinking “the more the merrier.”
             Is rationalism the evil that has caused this present impersonal age? Welll… lets not be irrational. Even God is rational… or is he? God’s thinking is not like ours, I don’t think I need Scripture to prove that (but do check Isaiah 55). So do we throw rationalism out the window? A way of living that has transcended our thinking more than we know, it seems impossible not to rationalize. In fact I’m rationalizing rationalism this moment, mind boggling.
             The age of reason popularized as men came together to discuss their ideas, to discuss life and how it would be better if… (fill in the blank). Interestingly the rationalists I’m referring to were all originally mathematicians. They liked calculations and liked the idea of making calculable ideologies; valued based on their numerical conclusion.  It seems strange to us but before the age of reason, the norm was set and no one was to question it. These men questioned the norm, they pointed their fingers in blame for the state of humanity and encouraged new ideas. I’m very grateful for them, so in a way I’m greatful for rationalism.  Here were the seeds of modernism, the beginning of “reconstructionism” and much of it was in regards to God; their view of who God was and how he related to the world was being reconstructed.
              Its unfortunate that with rationalism came a sense of pride that took God out of the equation. A type of thinking came about called deism, God is far away, he’s the creator who has left us to rationally run the world (since we of course are smart enough).   The hopes and dreams for mankind were torn apart with the Great Wars of the 20th century. Would God really just leave humanity alone when this is how we treat one another? “Christian” nations at war with other “Christian” nations. The effects of the wars were tantamount, drastically causing many to question their previous worldview of a progressing humanity that didn’t need God. about a thousand years ago, it was agreed that all “rationalism” in the human mind is made possible by God himself (see Anselm on this, c 1000 ad). Anselm, during the 11th century meditated on Psalm 14: “Fools say in their hearts, ‘there is no God.’ ” His conclusion was that the fool was the one who was irrational, and that rationalism and logic, at its best, points to God. Times have changed.
              Here’s the point. We have opinions that have come from our ability to reason, whether we know it or not. Opinions create positions, which create suppositions, which create pre-suppositions. Opinions are good to have, we have been given a mind, and we should use it. But pre-suppositions are destructive. What I mean by presupposition is opinion combined with arrogance; it’s confidently and unteachably  asserting a position (sometimes unconsciously). We don’t realize it but we do this all the time. We do it with God. Do the words “in your own image” ring a bell? That’s what we do, we create an image of God that fits our “positions.”  We assign him a specific morality (or ethic), we ascribe to a certain language (often called Christianese), we wear our suits and put on our “preacher voice” (ever wondered why so many preachers sound exactly the same? JUST BE YOURSELF!) ETC… we essentially place God in mathematical equations: A + B = C … and anathematize people who may not agree with your equation. Don’t be mistaken, just because they don’t agree with your equation (denomination, doctrine, ministry method, blablabla) it doesn’t mean that they are rejecting the person of Christ!
               How could it be that one day, Jesus is being praised as he enters into Jerusalem, people shouting “Hosanna!” Yet just a few days later, they cried out “crucify Him!”? When Jesus didn’t fit their presuppositions, they killed him. When Jesus doesn’t fit your presuppositions and your equations, you will kill the life of God in you.  He was to be a King, not of this world. 
               So this Easter, lets remember that Christ laid down his life for us.  Your (our) silly pre-suppositions about Him will kill his life in you. You haven’t figured life out, thats okay, depend on Jesus. You don’t have all the answers, that’s okay, depend on Jesus. May we never, ever, under no circumstance, think we’ve figured it out, creating ideologies that place God in a box, and condemn those who don’t agree. But rather lets look to Christ and trust Him:
“as he approached Jerusalem and saw the city, he wept over it.” (Luke 19:41)

Ye Holy Angels Bright

In 1681, on the year that his wife died after 19 years of marriage, Richard Baxter wrote the words for the hymn Ye Holy Angels Bright.

Ye holy angels bright,
who wait at God’s right hand,
or through the realms of light
fly at your Lord’s command,
assist our song,
for else the theme
too high doth seem
for mortal tongue.

Ye blessed souls at rest,
who ran this earthly race
and now, from sin released,
behold your Savior’s face,
his praises sound,
as in his sight
with sweet delight
ye do abound.

Ye saints, who toil below,
adore your heavenly King,
and onward as ye go
some joyful anthem sing;
take what he gives
and praise him still,
through good or ill,
who ever lives!

My soul, bear thou thy part,
triumph in God above:
and with a well-tuned heart
sing thou the songs of love!
Let all thy days
till life shall end,
whate’er he send,
be filled with praise!

“Pia Desideria” (Pious Desires) – Philip Jacob Spener

“Every Christian is bound not only to offer himself and what he has, his prayer, thanksgiving, good works, alms, etc., but also industriously to study in the Word of the Lord, with the grace that is given him to teach others, especially those under his own roof, to chastise, exhort, convert and edify them, to observe their life, pray for all, and insofar as possible be concerned about their salvation.” (Pia Disideria, Fortress Press, 1964, p. 94)

Introduction

Philip Jacob Spener’s Pia Desideria was first published in 1675 written as an instructional treatise intended for ministers of the church. Spener was a Lutheran bishop who had originally written a preface for Johann Arndt’s True Christianity.  Within six months, he published Pia Desideria also known as “Pious Desires.” Its purpose was to respond to barren spiritual conditions in the church, of which he described as “slothful,” “a terrible ignorance,” and consequently a “disorderly life” (93).

3 Dimensions

The main theme revealed in the selected excerpt is that of the personal Christian lifestyle. Under the assumption that the readers are themselves Christian who have experienced salvation, Spenner emphasizes the outcome of that salvation has having three main dimensions. Firstly that of the inward dimension; that “every Christian is bound” to “offer himself and what he has.” This of course is closely associated to a preceding dimension that is assumed in the text, that of upward relations with God manifested in salvation. Lastly, and perhaps most emphatically is the outward dimension; the edification of fellow Christians by means of a community centered on good works and the study of Scripture. This is the visible manifestation of the Christian lifestyle seen in three dimensions; upward, inward, and outward.

The Big Idea

The outward dimension of the personal Christian lifestyle is the main emphasis of the document. The author assumes that the reader is a Christian, and “all Christians are made priests by their Savior, are anointed by the Holy Spirit, and are dedicated to perform spiritual-priestly acts” (92). This inward dimension of the Christian life is one of assuming a responsibility,  Spenner ardently claims that “the people must have impressed upon them and must accustom themselves to believing that it is by no means enough to have knowledge of the Christian faith, for Christianity consists rather of practice” (95). Upon acquiring this responsibility, the Church experiences edification on primarily a personal level, and leading up to a universal level, “more and more would be achieved, and finally the church would be visibly reformed” (95).

Historical Impact

The protestant reformation, though essentially a positive shift in orthodox theology, came with some unfortunate consequences of extremism. Prior to the reformation, there existed an immense fear of sin, purgatory, hell, and ultimately God (perhaps for wrong reasons).  17th century scholastics who sought to systematize doctrine and rational thought, positively emphasized the importance of the Christian mind, breaking down notions of anti-intellectualism. The unfortunate repercussion was an antinomian lifestyle dominating the church. The challenge offered by Spener in Pia Desideria was one that instigated the change from a religion of the head to one of the heart. The dry and lifeless Christianity of the 17th century was now “coming alive” with the help of Spener’s legacy and the many who built upon it.

Searching for Truth

My journey is like Moses who went on the mountain in Exodus 24 in search for God. Or at least my convictions tell me that it should be. He was in search of true theology, while his people waiting for him decided they’d come up with their own theology. One that served creation rather than creator. It came by their impatience and desire to worship.

Moses went up the mountain, was there for a long time, and sought God. My prayer is that my theology would also be formed through prayer. There are many books and commentaries and denominations that interpret biblical theology differently, giving us various “religions” under one theology.

My belief is that there are strengths and weaknesses in every denomination. This places me on a search for truth. Others may be in a place where they too are searching for correct theology, and maybe some believe they have found it. Wherever you are, I pray that you wouldn’t be defined by your denomination, whether Reformed or Pentecostal, or something else, but you would be defined by prayer, not prayer itself, but the result of prayer. In order for this to happen we must be passionate about truth. Truth that doesn’t waiver. Truth that may sometimes offend. Truth that may be hard to swallow.

Moses went up the mountain, Jesus went to a desolate place, and we too ought to seek divine truth in momentous occasions of faith: prayer fueled by our desire for unrelenting truth.

How To Know What Real Revival Looks Like

By: Ray Ortlund

*Cited from: http://ow.ly/4pY0L **

In 1972 I heard J. I. Packer lecture at my seminary. One simple sentence of his has echoed in my mind ever since: “Do not neglect the revival dimension in your ministry.” Revival ispowerfully Christ-exalting. That is what I desire. And I am guessing that you, as you follow The Resurgence, feel the same passion.

What is a true revival?

But how can we distinguish true revival from false? Not everything labeled “revival” can be trusted and welcomed. Fortunately, we have guidance from a master theologian,Jonathan Edwards, who studied the Bible profoundly and experienced revival personally.
In his essay The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God Edwards offered categories for discernment from 1 John 4:1, where the apostle writes, “Beloved, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God…”

Not everything going on in church is of God

Edwards broke it down into two broad categories. First, negative signs. That is, what’s going on in a church may or may not be of God. We just can’t be sure. Edwards listed nine negativeevidences:
  1. What’s stirring in a church is new, unprecedented, surprising.
  2. People are emotionally aroused, trembling and weeping, even passing out.
  3. It attracts attention and causes a public stir.
  4. People have intense experiences, and spiritual things become vividly real.
  5. What draws people in is the example of others.
  6. The people involved misbehave at times, even get weird.
  7. Satan mixes in his delusions.
  8. Some of the people involved fall into bad doctrine and sin.
  9. The preachers scare people with their portrayal of God’s wrath and hell.
Edwards believed that a movement marked by these negative signs is not necessarily disqualified as true revival. But we need to know more.

God at work

Second, there are positive signs—that is, proofs that God mustbe at work. A revival is always imperfect, because we complicate it. But we can still know for sure that God is there too. The devil not only won’t, but can’t produce these outcomes:
  1. People lovingly raise their esteem of the biblical Jesus, displayed in the gospel.
  2. The movement pushes back against sin and Satan’s hold on people’s lives.
  3. People revere the Bible with a settled conviction that it is God’s truth.
  4. People receive and are helped by sound theology, even though it means they have to change.
  5. People grow in love for Christ and in loving humility toward one another.
Edwards taught that when spiritual power moves through a church with this impact, the Holy Spirit has done it. This is revival. We should receive it with enthusiasm.

Stay low before the Lord

One reason I’m glad to be involved in Acts 29 is that if we will stay low before the Lord, what he is doing among us could surge into “times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord” (Acts 3:20). The very thought moves me. I hope it moves you too.
Lord Jesus, visit us with power for this generation, to the praise of your glorious grace!

Cited from: http://ow.ly/4pY0L

Classic book on revival….

Jesus; the Sum, the Center

“Jesus is both the sum and center of our Christian faith. In a conversation I was privileged to have with noted theologian Dr. David Wells, he made mention of a very insightful fact. Unlike most religions, Christianity has no place, language, race, or culture that serves as a center to hold it together. Christians share no worldwide headquarters, no common language, no common race or ethnic heritage, and no common framework. The only thing that holds all of Christianity together is the risen Lord Jesus Christ who is alive today.”

Mark Driscoll
Vintage Jesus pg 200 –

Wether you Eat or Drink…

 

I recently heard someone preach on the verse: “whether you eat or you drink, do it all for the glory of God..” (1 Cor 10:31). The preacher went on to say that as Christians we sometimes “dichotomize” our lives. We’ve got the “secular” part of life: being with friends, going out, doing laundry, whatever. And then the “religious (or spiritual)” part of life where we go to church, we have our devotionals, we pray, we seek God. Rightly so, his point was that “dichotomized Christianity” doesn’t really exist.

This is a concept I’ve been thinking and wrestling with a lot over the last few weeks. Most might say that the subject and focus of this verse is “you.” That is true, but let me take it further and add to it.

I want to point out that the end all, the purpose, the goal, the highlight is not about what “you” (and me) are doing… but its about the Glory of God. This tells me much about God’s character, He’s interested in the ‘fine print’ of life. Ever read the Bible and get to a genealogy? Those are kind of boring, but they remind me of God’s attention to detail; to me and you those names mean nothing! But God see’s them and smiles because he knows everything about them.

God’s not so big and great and awesome that he only cares about the “important things” in life, but he’s so big, great and awesome because he see’s and cares about every little thing in every person’s life, that ever existed and ever will. In fact, the day he called Abraham he knew that I would be writing this note today. The day of the flood, he knew that you would be reading this note.

So wether I eat, or I drink, I’ll glorify God because He knows that I’m eating and drinking. But it doesn’t end there. Romans 8:28-29 says that all things work together for the good for those who love God and are called for his purpose. Everything includes the small things…. my conception of this is that God allows EVERYthing to happen so that they become an opportunity for the good, which is to be more like Jesus. It comes down to this: when you pray for more faith, will God just give you faith or will he give you an opportunity to have faith? Or maybe your dealing with patience, like most of us who like to be in control of time. Maybe you can figure that one out and let me know.

I wish I had a proper conclusion to this, luckily its not something I’m graded on… but Jonathan Edwards, an 18th century preacher said “the chief ends of man is to Glorify God; BY enjoying Him.” When all is said and done, all our unpleasant circumstances will still remain unpleasant no matter how much “Christian jargon” we add to it. BUT, there is a peace when we realize that, whether we eat or drink, whatever we do… we can glorify God, because while you are doing your thing, God see’s, he knows, he hears, and he’s setting you up, not to fail, but to succeed in becoming more like him.